I’m a Christian but I never talk about Jesus?

In his letter to the Corinthians the Apostle Paul offers a weighty admonition for Christians to “examine [themselves] to see whether [they] are in the faith (2 Cor 13:5).” A number of personal assessments could be applied. The apostle John offers several in his first epistle: Do you live an unholy life while claiming to be a Christian (1 John 1:5)? Do you refuse to acknowledge your sin ( 1:8-10)? Do you show love to others (2:10)?

One that I think is particularly helpful is this: do you think and speak often of your Christian faith? Do you talk about your adoration for Christ? Do you speak highly of the Church and the mission to make disciples? Do you speak often against the horrors of sin, and the desire of a holy life? Do those in your community know plainly how much your christian walk means to you? If one was to peruse your social media pages, listen in on your daily conversations, observe your regular musings about life, would they discover a heart that is completely sold out to Christ?

A true, regenerated, born again Christian will inevitably express his love for Christ, his passion for the Church, and his sorrow of sin. The Christian cannot help but speak of Jesus. As the early Christians agreed, “we cannot but speak of what we have seen and heard (Acts 4:20).” Therefore, the Christian’s social media thread will inevitably be a platform for proclaiming Jesus, his conversations with others will eventually lead to spiritual things, and repentance of sin will be confessed regularly.

When Paul urges us to “examine ourselves” we may want to do some personal inventory on how much we speak publicly about our Christian faith. If upon reflection you discover that your conversations, private thinking, and public reputation admittedly lacks mention of Jesus, you may want to ask the question “why?” If, in fact, you are a Christian who has “taken up his cross and followed Jesus (Matthew 16:24-26),” why doesn’t it come up in conversation? If you are “unashamed of the Gospel (Rom 1:16)” why do your unbelieving friends not hear much about Jesus? Examine yourself fellow Christian. If you are truly saved, your mouth will prove it. As Jesus said, “out of the heart the mouth speaks (Luke 6:45).”

Are people generally good? A foundational question for young evangelicals.

I ran across a very interesting debate (conversation?) that sheds much light on the contemporary landscape among young liberals and their political views. As a young individual with more conservative leanings I am concerned as to the future of our nation, and her approach to biblical virtues and morals. You can decide as to where you stand on the issues discussed in the video yourself; it is definitely an intriguing dialogue.

But as you listen to the conversation take note during the conclusion of the discussion. Dennis Prager submits what he sees as the essential dividing line between both groups–Are humans essentially good? How would you respond to such a query? Prager answers in the negative while the young college students answer in the positive. I think Prager has put his finger on an important issue that influences how one shapes his or her worldview.

One slightly familiar with the biblical narrative will realize before he reaches Genesis 4 that human nature has been seriously affected by sin. A biblical worldview argues that we as humans are not generally good but generally evil. Paul makes this clear in the opening chapters of Romans, claiming that “none does good not even one (Romans 3:12),” and “that all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23).” In Ephesians Paul makes it clear that we were “dead in our trespasses and sins (Ephesians 2:1).”

So, yes this is a crucial question in trying to determine why society is the way it is. The young college students propose that “badness” is the result of social conditioning; change the circumstances, change the people. But go back as far as you want, and you will discover that every generation struggles with being “good.” The Bible however offers the only true remedy to the problem of badness–It is in the regeneration of the Spirit of God graciously bestowed to us by the perfect sacrifice of Jesus on the cross. A transformation must occur for lives to be changed. No amount of social conditioning, behavioral correcting, psychological diagnosing, or any other treatment will suffice. No, if the Bible is true then we have to conclude that true formation of our attitude and behavior can only come through the supernatural work of God! Thus, Paul can go on to say in Ephesians 2 “But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ (Ephesians 2:4). “